Bill Gibb at Somerset`s Fashion Museum (Oct 08 – Oct 09)

Bill Gibb launched onto the catwalk in the 70`s and although he is a relatively low key name in the fashion design world, he remains one of the UK`s best kept secrets.

Somerset`s Fashion Museum is unveiling his priceless collection adorned by the stars of the past this October with a display lasting just over a year. The collection will include approximately 25 ensembles, all of the clothes on display will show the designer`s love of romance and flights of fantasy, as well as his flamboyant flair for decoration and dramatic effect.

Bill Gibb
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Soft leather jacket printed with silver bees and chrysanthemums, 1972 The leather print was designed by Sally Maclachlan for Bill Gibb. A skirt and jacket ensemble from the same collection – Bill Gibb`s first solo collection – is part of the display at the Fashion Museum.
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Short knitted angora jacket and matching hat, 1972 The knitwear in this ensemble, a version of which is part of the display at the Fashion Museum, was created by Mildred Boulton for Bill Gibb for his first solo collection in 1972.
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Bianca Jagger wearing printed silk kimono, 1977 A version of this silk kimono by Bill Gibb – here worn by Bianca Jagger.
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Rosemary Harden, Fashion Museum Manager, commented `One of the things we`re trying to do here at the Fashion Museum in Bath is to showcase the work of British fashion designers whose names aren`t necessarily that well known, but whose contribution to British fashion has been significant. It is therefore fantastic to have the opportunity to work with Iain to create this display of the work of Bill Gibb, a truly unsung hero of British fashion. This follows on from the Fashion Museum`s John Bates Fashion Designer exhibition in 2006. We hope that all the visitors who enjoyed that show will return to the Fashion Museum to discover the work of Bill Gibb in the new display.”

If Bill Gibb`s collection doesn`t quite do it for you, the Museum itself has an outstanding collection of more than 60,000 objects of fashionable dress- including dresses, shirts, skirts, jumpers, and even underwear and nightgowns, plus shoes and accessories from the late sixteenth century to the present day. It makes for fantastic inspiration for any designer!

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